Curious about Curiosity - Page 4

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John Henry Dough


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Reply: 61



PostPosted: March 2, 2012 3:19 PM 

Perhaps they are talking about the drill being '''clean''
dx,posted about this a month (or longer) ago.

All is well.(I Hope and Pray)

[link]

John Henry Dough


Posts: xxx

Reply: 62



PostPosted: March 4, 2012 10:01 PM 

Comment::
Nice Link.
John


http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/mission/instruments/

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 63



PostPosted: March 20, 2012 10:18 PM 

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2012/pdf/2864.pdf

Subsurface reflections at the Gale landing ellipse were detected by the SHARAD radar instrument on the MRO orbiter. The landing area is also at a very low elevation, 3km below the "datum" (the Mars equivalent of "sea level"). Possibility of ground ice?

MSL better be prepared for a rough landing---the radar indicates the surface is rougher than all the previous landing sites on Mars.

Kevin Author Profile Page



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Reply: 64



PostPosted: March 29, 2012 6:12 AM 

The mountain at Gale Crater is named Mount Sharp.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-090

dx


Posts: 1661

Reply: 65



PostPosted: March 29, 2012 10:06 AM 

...this is a controlled vertical drop c/w visuals directed at the ground...I see no problem with a clean landing.

yt
dx

Kevin Author Profile Page



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Reply: 66



PostPosted: March 30, 2012 5:18 AM 

That Sky Crane is going to scare the hell out all of us! Gale was chosen partly because because of the landing elipse and there is margin for error. Thankfully we are far more precise at navigating to the planet, we just need to hope the upper atmosphere high speed winds are not in a bad mood!

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 67



PostPosted: April 22, 2012 1:58 AM 

[link]

A summary of Mars Society talks, including this one:


Michel Cabane, from LATMOS, co-principal investigator of SAM (i.e: Sample Analysis at Mars), one of the main instruments of the mission aboard the MSL rover Curiosity, the new exploration mission to be launched in November 2011, has developed the theme of the search for organic molecules on Mars. He explained how organic materials can be destroyed by hydrogen peroxide and perchlorate on the surface of Mars and described the SAM equipment which makes 50 percent of the mass of the 75 kg of scientific instruments aboard Curiosity. Its sensitivity is such that a single bacterium can be detected. SAM is therefore expected to clarify the surprising results obtained by the Viking instruments in the 1970s.

There are also abstracts of the talks:

[link]

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 68



PostPosted: May 10, 2012 4:18 PM 

[link]

A short blurb about the mission.

Kevin


Posts: xxx

Reply: 69



PostPosted: June 22, 2012 12:12 PM 

7 minutes of terror! NASA video on what it will be like putting Curiosity on the surface of Mars.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzqdoXwLBT8

Kevin


Posts: xxx

Reply: 70



PostPosted: June 27, 2012 5:07 AM 

Curiosity has made a few minor adjustments to its trajectory and mission controllers are confident they are bang on track as they enter the "approach phase". The landing elipse has been greatly reduced and they hope to put the one ton rover down very close to Sharp Mountain so as to save a couple of months traversing to the primary target.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-188

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 71



PostPosted: July 17, 2012 1:20 AM 

[link]

NASA news conference today about the MSL landing, including video of the entire news conference.

zoost


Posts: 56

Reply: 72



PostPosted: July 17, 2012 5:57 AM 

@Kevin #69

You have to watch from 4:14 in that youtube. The narrator says something about lowering the rover at a 20 meter long distance with a 21 feet line. Serious. They lost a mission on the metric and imperial difference once, that should be enough.

Aside from tat remark, beautifull video and fantastic engineering.

zoost


Posts: 56

Reply: 73



PostPosted: July 17, 2012 6:01 AM 

For the people with an xbox

http://marketplace.xbox.com/en-US/Product/Mars-Rover-Landing/66acd000-77fe-1000-9115-d80258480836

hortonheardawho


Posts: 3465

Reply: 74



PostPosted: July 17, 2012 11:07 AM 

zoost, My guess is that yes, the lines are 6.4 meters long and that the skycrane stops and hovers at 30 meters, lowers MSL the full length of the lines and then slowly descends until the rover touches the ground - and then severs the lines and then flies away and then the fun begins.

What scares me the most is 500,000 lines of unproven code for EDL. "BLE Abort". Oops. Should have been BGE.

hortonheardawho


Posts: 3465

Reply: 75



PostPosted: July 17, 2012 11:40 AM 

From Kevin:

Still cannot post from work computer but I lurk instead but here a few answers to the debate that has been going on regarding Odyssey:

Nasa may miss Curiosity Mars rover's landing signal.

Mars Rover Driver posted on Twitter yesterday that there is not expected to be any comms or drive until Wed eve.

Hope all is well with you.

Best regards,


Kevin

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 76



PostPosted: July 18, 2012 3:14 PM 

I find the fact that Curiosity has a laser "zapper" quite intriguing.

I wonder whether a zap from the laser at night could be detected by an orbiting satellite?

If so, it might be possible to extract from the signal interesting information about particular paths through the atmosphere, or it could perhaps serve as a last-ditch communication method.

John Henry Dough


Posts: xxx

Reply: 77



PostPosted: July 19, 2012 8:32 PM 

Wish we had a wind sock like Pheonix and an
audio system...can't have everything I guess.

I for one will be PRAYING for a safe landing.
jd.

Kevin Author Profile Page



Posts: no

Reply: 78



PostPosted: July 21, 2012 8:32 AM 

#77 MSL has the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station:

Information about wind, temperatures and humidity
comes from electronic sensors on two finger-like booms
extending horizontally from partway up the main vertical
mast holding the ChemCam laser and the Mastcam.
Each of the booms holds a sensor for recording air temperature
and three sensors for detecting air movement
in three dimensions. Placement of the booms at an
angle of 120 degrees from each other enables calculating
the velocity even when the main mast is blocking the
wind from one direction. The boom pointing toward the
front of the rover, Boom 2, also holds the humidity sensor
inside a downward-tilted protective cylinder. Boom
1, pointing to the side and slightly toward the rear, holds
an infrared sensor for measuring ground temperature

John Henry Dough


Posts: xxx

Reply: 79



PostPosted: July 21, 2012 9:31 AM 

A very informative,interesting link.


http://techland.time.com/2012/07/16/mission-to-mars-8-amazing-tech-tools-aboard-nasas-curiosity-rover/

Kevin Author Profile Page



Posts: no

Reply: 80



PostPosted: July 22, 2012 8:15 AM 

The very first post on this thread has a link to a 60 page document detailing everything about Curiosity. If this baby can make touch down there will be some fantastic science coming our way!

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