Curious about Curiosity - Page 20

Previous 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 ... 33 Next
Author Message
Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 381



PostPosted: August 26, 2012 1:22 PM 

Some random thoughts.

Olivine is a green mineral, and it seems likely that there is olivine in some places on Mount Sharp.

An absolute humidity of 8% corresponds to a frost point of about -30 Celsius on Mars. Since we have seen frost at the Opportunity site, it is plausible that the locaL humidity may reach that level at some times in some places, especially during the change of seasons when H2O is moving from one polar cap to the other.

The description of the humidity sensor says it measures relative humidity, but since that would vary with temperature in the day-night cycle, I presume the intention was to convert that to absolute humidity in order to present a relatively stable figure.

dx


Posts: 1661

Reply: 382



PostPosted: August 26, 2012 2:26 PM 

folks>>>

Something is bothering me....here it is. If where Curiosity has landed and its an ancient water bed in Gale crater and we are looking at the bottom rocks of this ancient sea, why is this monster Rover traversing to HIGHER ground?

Am I missing something?

yt
dx

Thomas Lee Elifritz


Posts: 10

Reply: 383



PostPosted: August 26, 2012 2:36 PM 

First of all I'm a biased commentator so anything I say should be taken lightly, but I believe the bottom of the crater is covered with two or three layers of surface sediments, wind blown dust, crater ejects, etc. The best area is the mottled terrain eroding out of the base of the mountain, and it appears to me they could get a taste of that far quicker without even traversing the basalt dunes.

I'm happy Steve Squyres isn't running this. I already see evidence that interesting things will be found at the base of this, although Gale crater was my last choice for a suitable location for fossil searching.

LWS


Posts: 3062

Reply: 384



PostPosted: August 26, 2012 3:27 PM 

Barsoomer; Thanks for your very informative random thoughts. Am I correct in interpreting one of them to mean that since frost was seen for Oppy and Viking, that the absolute humidity, at a presumed temperature of -30 celcius, would have been 8% or thereabouts in those early rover/lander images. Thus, it may not be entirely unreasonable for a value of 8% humidity to be seen at the base of gale crater.

What happens when the absolute humidity is the average of presumably several values? Does it mean that the 8% figure could have been consistent for some time? Could this also mean that there is an opportunity for water to interact with the surface at Gale for meaningful periods of time? Could it also explain the H captured on the surface only of the first rock sampled by Chem cam?

Winston

dx


Posts: 1661

Reply: 385



PostPosted: August 26, 2012 4:22 PM 

h>>>

Here is an image using your NEW macro Bayer-RGB large size.

yt
dx

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 386



PostPosted: August 26, 2012 4:54 PM 

dx, This big paper by Anderson and Bell proposes two routes that Curi might take, both bound for the Mountain but even more exciting maybe, both require descending into the Valley of Dark Sand that lies between Curi and the Mountain. (The Valley is very beautiful from orbit.)

http://marsjournal.org/contents/2010/0004/files/anderson_mars_2010_0004.pdf

There are so many features of interest in Gale Crater that it must be hard to know where to start. The interest near Bradbury Station is in what appears to be an alluvial fan that terminates inverted channels that appear to connect to a channel network emerging from the mountains of the crater "wall". (Hard to say if any original crater wall makes up the present surface because of filling and exhumation.) There are channels that look water carved all around the "wall" and one big one that enters from right outside the crater and continues for kms across the floor.

The interest on the Mons is in phylosilicate showings, 3 or more strata that show layering, and also channels. One channel on the Mound needs no other name than Big Canyon. The Mountain has a kind of Cartoonish look to it, almost like it has been created to illustrate really clear idealized examples of a number of different processes, only the actual phenomena is this case are all mysterious. Kind of like Charles Lyle and Lewis Carroll collaborated on an introductory geology textbook.

LWS


Posts: 3062

Reply: 387



PostPosted: August 26, 2012 5:18 PM 

Hi Hort;

Please post the bayerRGB addendum. I tried the original and it works OK

Winston

hortonheardawho


Posts: 3465

Reply: 388



PostPosted: August 26, 2012 5:40 PM 

er, Winston, see the Flickr comments of reply 239 of the imagej basics topic for the code.

John Henry Dough


Posts: xxx

Reply: 389



PostPosted: August 26, 2012 5:49 PM 

Hey Kye,,,,,,,,that is a BIG chunk of pdf
on Gale,,,,fascinating in depth,,,literally hours of 'must read',,for me.Others can make their own choice,,,its 53 pages long,graphs,
maps,links.Fascinating.
Thanks
jd

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 390



PostPosted: August 27, 2012 12:55 AM 

Winston, your reply 383 read my thoughts. The chemcam surface H reading does seem consistent with a high humidity--for Mars. This may be an exceptional location.

On another topic, Kye mentions the "valley of dark sand." I too feel that is an intriguing feature and wonder if the dunes are really just dunes. They seem to be at the lowest elevation in the crater and I wonder if water might have played any role in their formation.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 391



PostPosted: August 27, 2012 1:02 AM 

[link]

The weather site is now showing Sol 19 (last time it was Sol 16). So maybe it is operational now, BUT the humidity and wind speed fields have been left blank.

My guess is that the sensor really did register 8% on Sol 16, but the team members did not really believe it, so they are running more diagnostics.

newboy


Posts: 1

Reply: 392



PostPosted: August 27, 2012 3:39 AM 

Hort,
Re the green view, does this review help? It is outside my knowledge.
[link]

hortonheardawho


Posts: 3465

Reply: 393



PostPosted: August 27, 2012 7:20 AM 

newboy, my best argument for the "reality" of the "green" is this:

Please read the Flickr comment if you need words. I notice that geologists need words - lots and lots of words.

MPJ


Posts: 250

Reply: 394



PostPosted: August 27, 2012 8:24 AM 

Does NASA's Curiosity Rover Have the Smarts to Find Life on Mars?
[link]

Interesting article which very well acknowledge the prime importance of MSL detecting organics. They even draw the circle back to Viking but as usual the article ignores/avoid/whatever the Viking LR results and subsequent analysis' at all.

Funnily a well known (NASA-) astrobiologist says this about Gale as landing site:
"Curiosity's instrumentation and the choice of landing sites for MSL were optimized for exploring ancient habitable environments, not modern ones..."

hortonheardawho


Posts: 3465

Reply: 395



PostPosted: August 27, 2012 9:21 AM 

sol 0017 closeup "natural color" pan (HD format ):

with a link to the Enhanced Difference False Color version.

Ooooh! What a pretty picture.

dx


Posts: 1661

Reply: 396



PostPosted: August 27, 2012 9:33 AM 

h>>>

Building the latest Bayer downloads with your wonderful program and YES they are pretty pictures.[still shaking my head on your formula-its outstanding]

yt
dx

dx


Posts: 1661

Reply: 397



PostPosted: August 27, 2012 11:41 AM 

h>>>

Have you tried to color a ChemCam shot?

yt
dx

hortonheardawho


Posts: 3465

Reply: 398



PostPosted: August 27, 2012 12:46 PM 

er, no I haven't dx.

I have no idea where the particular rocks in the Chemcam images are - so I can't use a Mastcam-100 image to colorize them.

I have no intentions to work with the Chemcam images at all.

The super-secret French Chemcam guy will tell us what we need to know. Did I mention that Europeans only tell you what you need to know?

dx


Posts: 1661

Reply: 399



PostPosted: August 27, 2012 2:01 PM 

h>>>
LOLOLOLOLOLOLOL
yt
dx

John Henry Dough


Posts: xxx

Reply: 400



PostPosted: August 27, 2012 2:18 PM 

A small excerpt from MPJ's link above ,,reply
393

Turning point


"In my opinion the turning point in the search for life on Mars would be if Curiosity finds organics," said Alfonso Davila, senior research scientist at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, Calif. He is a principal investigator at the Carl Sagan Center for the Search of Life in the Universe.
Davila told SPACE.com that if or when Curiosity establishes that it has the capability to detect organics near the surface, "then the focus should turn to understanding the nature and the origin of those organics, and to establish whether they are linked to life."
End Paste

A really good article on just what we have here on Mars,,along with what we DO NOT have.
A possible eye opener for some but of interest to all of MRB,,,I would think.Oh,and
thanks MPJ
jd

Previous 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 ... 33 Next


Join the conversation:















Very Happy Smile Sad Surprised
Shocked Confused Cool Laughing
Mad Razz Embarassed Crying or Very Sad
Evil or Very Mad Twisted Evil Rolling Eyes Wink
Powered by MTSmileys