South Endeavour Crater - Page 6

Previous 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
Author Message
Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 101



PostPosted: May 18, 2017 9:40 PM 

Enhanced 3D of portion of the shining hill. To my eye, it looks as if there are stalactites hanging down from the overhanging rock. That might suggest the bright areas contain some deliquescent salt that absorbs water from the atmosphere producing some dripping material. Stalactites are normally in caves but presumably they could form from any dripping mineral solution.

Joe Smith


Posts: 86

Reply: 102



PostPosted: May 18, 2017 9:49 PM 

Durn shure looks like ice,, don't it>

Winston glad to see you post again awhile back.

I Pray your health is ok.

Not that many of the old gang left,,, although it seems it is moving on to
positive membership!

Very hard at times to write my thoughts.
Trying to say that the MRB is in good hands.
There!

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 103



PostPosted: May 21, 2017 8:45 PM 

Long baseline 3D made by combining images from two different locations. Greatly increases the depth perception (although the resolution from one of the locations was not as good). Brightened to bring out small details and better match the images.

Better shows the rock structures at the location of the image in reply 101.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 104



PostPosted: May 24, 2017 2:21 AM 

A mini-version of the shining hill?

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 105



PostPosted: May 24, 2017 2:47 AM 

A placid scene...

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 106



PostPosted: May 24, 2017 9:05 AM 

There is some odd surface features on the slopes in this area that we should take a look at. Look at the strange, dark depressions on the lower right:

It has me thinking that maybe this sunken area has some dynamics similar to RSLs we have seen elsewhere but in miniature form.
After looking at this I noticed that some of the ripple, or mini dunes in the area also have what also appears to be depressions on one side:

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 107



PostPosted: May 26, 2017 10:57 PM 

Signs of past drainage at this location. I would guess there were glaciers in this region sometime in the past, perhaps during a time of high obliquity.. Maybe some remnant survived to this day, covered by a protective layer of dust!

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 108



PostPosted: May 27, 2017 2:01 AM 

What are those spots above the rock? They appear to be level with the rock as though growing out of it.

John Radogno


Posts: 37

Reply: 109



PostPosted: May 27, 2017 10:27 AM 

Probably large rocks or boulders. The lower set may be a small exposed ridge. The images are too heavily distorted by the pixilization at this zoom level to get detail. It is impossible to get the 2 images in sync pixel by pixel The differences between the 2 images is a great example of how much distortion you can get at this zoom level.
There are interesting shapes in the rocks below the top as well that I would like a better view of.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 110



PostPosted: May 28, 2017 10:59 PM 

A colored look at those "speed-bump" thingies.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 111



PostPosted: June 1, 2017 11:38 PM 

http://morris1.verio.com/ftp/edge.png

Likely once a small ponded area. Very bright at the "red edge" wavelength (750 nm) while dark at L7 (UV). Thus, it absorbs the UV light while strongly reflecting at 750 nm.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 112



PostPosted: June 1, 2017 11:47 PM 

As a jpg.

Likely once a small ponded area. Very bright at the "red edge" wavelength (750 nm) while dark at L7 (UV). Thus, it absorbs the UV light while strongly reflecting at 750 nm.

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 113



PostPosted: June 2, 2017 10:12 AM 

Barsoomer,
Re: 343, Thanks for the close up. I had thought that the terrain on the concave sides of these mini-dunes/drifts were slightly depressed and sunken, but you image doesn't show that so I guess I was wrong. It is still interesting that the terrain on the concave side is relatively smooth and pebble free compared to the surrounding area.
Re: 344, The link does not work for me. Are you referring to this on the lower left?:

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 114



PostPosted: June 2, 2017 8:35 PM 

John, yes that is the feature. The URL in Reply 111 is not a link; you need to copy and paste it to your browser window. How about the link in Reply 112---does that work?

By the way, 344 is not the reply number, it is the number of posts I had up to the point where the post counting stopped working (which is why you have an xxx for the number of posts).

John Radogno


Posts: 37

Reply: 115



PostPosted: June 2, 2017 8:50 PM 

Barsoomer,
111 did not work in my brouser. I could not see 112 until well after I posted 113!
It does look like a dried up small pond or perhaps a sink caused by subsurface out gassing or evaperate. So maybe there is a link to the smooth surface areas on the concave side of the mini-dune/ripples, that similar proccesses were at work on an even smaller scale.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 116



PostPosted: June 4, 2017 9:31 PM 

Another view of the "pond" area. Must be extremely smooth material to reflect the light like that.

John Radogno


Posts: 37

Reply: 117



PostPosted: June 4, 2017 10:12 PM 

Looks like there are some ripples in it.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 118



PostPosted: June 6, 2017 11:27 PM 

Some new images:



Unusual rocks at the top of the image.

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 119



PostPosted: June 7, 2017 10:16 AM 

Nice pictures Barsoomer, here are a couple smaller dips on the right side:

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 120



PostPosted: June 7, 2017 11:42 PM 

John, thanks for completing the picture.

My hypothesis about what we are seeing here is that there was once a large glacier where Winnemucca is now. According to this idea, meltwater from the glacier travelled in several directions including down along the rim of the crater in a broad flow that eventually poured over the rim and created the gully. I assume the rim was once wider and the flow caused part of the rim to collapse.

I don't know how long ago the glacier may have existed; it may be ancient or may have been as recent as the last major obliquity episode. The current bright material in Winnemucca may be minerals precipitated from the meltwater.

Previous 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6


Join the conversation:















Very Happy Smile Sad Surprised
Shocked Confused Cool Laughing
Mad Razz Embarassed Crying or Very Sad
Evil or Very Mad Twisted Evil Rolling Eyes Wink
Powered by MTSmileys