South Endeavour Crater - Page 5

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Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 81



PostPosted: April 30, 2017 10:30 PM 

No new images at rhe Exploratorium site (or elsewhere) since 4.27. Just when things were getting interesting again. ):

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 82



PostPosted: May 2, 2017 2:15 AM 

We can still see the shining hill.

edi


Posts: xxx

Reply: 83



PostPosted: May 2, 2017 7:23 PM 

Wish we were going there

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 84



PostPosted: May 2, 2017 9:36 PM 

Color image of the shining hill from several Sols ago.

Not sure what is causing the ruddy glow---could be some kind of artifact.

Hopefully we can get some more color images now that we are closer.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 85



PostPosted: May 2, 2017 10:18 PM 

A possible explanation for the red glow:

Vegetation's Red Edge: A Possible Spectroscopic Biosignature of Extraterrestrial Plants

The Pancam L2 filter is most sensitive to 750 nm infrared light, which apparently is also where the "Red Edge" occurs.

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 86



PostPosted: May 3, 2017 12:45 AM 

Was the image taken near sunset? We have seen the top of this feature looking very bright before, perhaps it, and the surrounding area that is also reflecting red, is picking up the red shift we see on Earth-side sunsets.

I have had the privilege of hiking in glacial areas and have had to filter out the red algae when melting ice for drinking water. Yeah, it could also be biological, but it covers the whole area, not just the bright spot.

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 87



PostPosted: May 3, 2017 7:06 AM 

I wonder if it could be a concentration of gypsum or other veins.

Nice image Barsoomer!

Winston

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 88



PostPosted: May 3, 2017 11:16 PM 

Winston, Thanks!

John, in response to your question, the color composite was made from the L2, L5, L7 filters on Sol 4690 at 15:45:34 local time. Sunset was at 18:01:44. Thus, it was over 2 hours before sunset; the Sun would have been about 34 degrees above the horizon towards the right (West, the image looks South). Probably not a sunset glow, if such occurs on Mars.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 89



PostPosted: May 4, 2017 8:35 PM 

04-mer-update-opportunity-perseverance-valley

Monthly MER update from the Planetary Society.

Apparently, they considered visiting the "Shining Hill" (Winnemucca Mesa) but it would have taken a side trip there and back because once they go into the gully, they cannot come back out. But we should at least get full-filter images of the feature at some point.

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 90



PostPosted: May 4, 2017 10:59 PM 

Barsoomer,
Thanks for the link. Following up on it I am getting mixed messages. On the one hand the update specifically says that the picture we are looking at was processed in false color by the Pancam team, which could mean it is not really red. That makes sense because they also say the feature is bright white but the surrounding terrain is dark; but in the processed picture, everything looks red due to the false coloring.

But, then they post this:

This pancam image was processed by Stuart Anderson, an astronomy outreach educator and poet, which the MER team calls near-rue color, which would mean everything, including the sky has a red tint!

I think the Red color may be an over-saturated artifact of the processing procedure.

I wish they would take the detour; I am still wondering if it could be a block of ice, it may not make sense given its location and exposure but perhaps there are some Mars-only conditions we do not yet know about that allow it to happen.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 91



PostPosted: May 5, 2017 1:33 AM 

Winnemucca is not a very attractive name. I suggest we call it "Camelot," the Shining City on a Hill.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 92



PostPosted: May 5, 2017 1:57 AM 

John, just saw your post. It does look like ice contained in a bowl-like formation of rocks. There are cracks or holes in the visible side of the bowl. If the bright mass was just dust, it should flow through the cracks but it seems rigid in place.

At this height, perhaps remnants of a glacier recently exposed. A thin covering of dust might prevent rapid sublimation.

I agree they should visit it even if it means delaying the gully tour. This is too important, especially for public interest. I understand the eagerness of the scientists to get to the gully, but the gully won't go away.

A hirise orbital view. Cropped from the "Where is Opportunity" image at JPL and rotated so that South is up. I think Camelot is the bright area near the bottom. Covered by reddish dust but with white areas peeking through.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 93



PostPosted: May 7, 2017 11:24 PM 

Here's another image showing the edge of the shining hill. John, yes, this is false color. It combines infrared (L2), green (L5), and ultraviolet (L7), instead of Red/Green/Blue. It also modifies the brightness of the channels for maximum dynamic range instead of accurate relative brightness. For example, it makes the sky here look blue when it should perhaps be pinkish-grey given the amount of dust at the moment.

The L4 and L5 and L6 filters are close to what the human eye sees as red and green and blue, so an L456 composite would be closer to true color, but one would have to guess at the relative brightness of the different filters. Also, it's unclear what we mean by "true color." I believe it is more useful to show the landscape as it would look under Earth lighting conditions, in order to maximize out intuition about what we are seeing, rather than how it might or might not look on Mars.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 94



PostPosted: May 8, 2017 1:39 AM 

Here is an L456 of Camelot. I think this approximates how it would look under Earth lighting.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 95



PostPosted: May 8, 2017 1:54 AM 

Note the green areas towards the right of the image.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 96



PostPosted: May 10, 2017 10:52 PM 

Middle of image: something peculiar there. Seems to be level with the rock in the 3D.

Sources:

Maybe they could get just a bit closer...to get a better image.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 97



PostPosted: May 10, 2017 11:01 PM 

Sorry here's the left eye that goes with the right eye (posted twice) in the last post.


Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 98



PostPosted: May 15, 2017 10:35 PM 


The area that leads in to the gully. I looks like some kind of flood water event undermined the hillside, judging by the overhang and the deposits beneath it.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 99



PostPosted: May 15, 2017 11:04 PM 

On second thoughts, the light-colored areas on the hillside are not deposits; instead, they seem to be bare areas in some kind of canopy that is draped over the hillside.

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 100



PostPosted: May 16, 2017 6:59 AM 

Barsoomer;

Very nice 3D at reply 99.

Looks like veins uncovered by fluvial action to me.

Winston

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