South Endeavour Crater - Page 20

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LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 381



PostPosted: May 11, 2018 8:24 AM 

Enhanced image from Barsoomer's reply 379.

I can't help but think that several of the Oppy and now Curi MI's show surface textures that are very reminiscent of degraded coral stone.

Winston

Joe Smith


Posts: xxx

Reply: 382



PostPosted: May 11, 2018 1:54 PM 

...then that would follow that at one time ''all of this was underwater?""

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 383



PostPosted: May 11, 2018 9:30 PM 

Hi Winston,

What I think I see in that image are spherules connected by a sticky matrix. As I see it, the holes are between spherules.

The coral rock has the holes but I don't think it has the spherules. You could be right though because the images, even enhanced, are blurry at best.

I would like to think that the spherules are oversized bacteria similar to Thiomargarita Namibiensis, and that the sticky matrix is secreted to form "strings of pearls" like T. Namib.

The above is from another solitary MI a few Sols before (rotated to correct the upside-down orientation of the MI). A portion enlarged:

This doesn't have any large holes but I think shows the spherules more clearly.

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 384



PostPosted: May 12, 2018 10:41 AM 

I'm not so sure about what we are seeing in the enlarged area. It might be the digital effect of the pixels.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 385



PostPosted: May 12, 2018 8:34 PM 

It was enlarged only to double size. If you look carefully, you can see the same spherules in the original images.

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 386



PostPosted: May 12, 2018 9:42 PM 

Barsoomer,
Yes, I can see them in the originals images. I can also see them in some of the darker areas of other material inside the holes and crevices. After looking at thousands of these images and examining a number of images that were debatable, I have to say this one looks very debatable to me. I see a lot of effects that are associated with the digitalized images when enlarged to the point were it appears that pixels are lining up, which is to say we are not yet zoomed in enough to look at individual pixels but rather the effect of small groups of pixels lining up with the one color share they share, which creates an illusion of patterns that do not exist. This may have to due with the particular way the camera was set up to take the image. Lets see if we can find more examples to compare to.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 387



PostPosted: May 12, 2018 11:51 PM 

Here is an MI image from Sol 182. It shows a fluffy white coating on some pebbles and blueberries that seems similar to what we are seeing on the rocks at Perseverance Valley. To me, it looks like the coating is having a corrosive effect on the pebbles.

If you look closely at the coating on the closest blueberry, it seems to be composed of many small individual particles with a generally spherical shape.

There is one other interesting aspect of this scene, but that is for a discussion at another time.

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 388



PostPosted: May 13, 2018 11:05 AM 

Thanks, Barsoomer. I can see the berry does not have a smooth surface. Is it corrosive or is something growing on it?

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 389



PostPosted: May 13, 2018 7:50 PM 

A personal speculation of mine is that evolutionary pressures on Mars may have favored gigantism in prokaryotic bacteria. This would allow them to store increasingly scarce nutrients in vacuoles in a similar manner to T. Namib. I think it is possible that the blueberries may even be extreme examples of this, perhaps with hematite in place of the sulfur or nitrate in T. Namib. If so, the images of "double berries" may be examples of mitosis captured and frozen in time (where a bacterium splits into two daughter cells).

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 390



PostPosted: May 13, 2018 9:34 PM 

Barssomer,
I like your speculations. And I agree that the extreme speculations are extreme possibilities, yet still possible. Genetic testing with prokaryotic bacteria and hematite replacement might be possible.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 391



PostPosted: May 13, 2018 9:53 PM 

Thanks, John. There are more images of the fluffy white stuff on Sol 199. Here it seems to be dissolving berries. If speculations about both being life forms have any validity, then this may be an example of predatory or scavenging activity pn Mars.

Darwin


Posts: xxx

Reply: 392



PostPosted: May 21, 2018 4:51 PM 

These are not new. They were called,"popcorn berries."Many anomalies.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 393



PostPosted: May 21, 2018 10:57 PM 

Hi Darwin, good to see you back.

Yes, those are from the early days of Sols 189 and 199. This 3d is new, from the Sol 5091 microscopic images:

It is interesting that we are seeing the foamy white stuff again (from the "popcorn" times) in Perseverance Valley. (But in a more elaborate setting.) I also see tiny white spheroids in the above image, but others may have different opinions.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 394



PostPosted: May 22, 2018 12:56 AM 

Concerning the foamy white stuff from "popcorn" days, see also Horton's wonderful renderings in Replies 25 and 28 from the following link:

[link]

The "disturbed" frame in the Reply 28 animation shows the small grains in the coating.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 395



PostPosted: May 22, 2018 9:07 PM 

Lots of grains or tiny spherules in this one.

John Radogno


Posts: 37

Reply: 396



PostPosted: May 23, 2018 4:55 PM 

It looks like there are a lot of very small holes or pits in the image, some of them appear on small ridges. Very intresting.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 397



PostPosted: May 24, 2018 1:30 AM 

Thanks John. It's nice to get some feedback. Maybe Winston's suggestion of degraded coral fits the data better.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 398



PostPosted: May 26, 2018 11:12 PM 

There is a fairly large drop off of height from the far bank, which seems strange for a natural stream. This may be a remnant of a pre-crater stream that has been exhumed (uncovered) by the wind.

John Radogno


Posts: 37

Reply: 399



PostPosted: May 26, 2018 11:27 PM 

That is a really great Mars riverbed image.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 400



PostPosted: May 27, 2018 9:43 PM 

Thanks, John. They just sent down an extra frame for the riverbed.

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