South Endeavour Crater - Page 19

Previous 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19
Author Message
Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 361



PostPosted: April 27, 2018 1:26 AM 

Note the regular bands of holes.

Looks like individual tiny spheroids in the "pseudopod."

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 362



PostPosted: April 27, 2018 8:34 PM 

Looks like they are planning to do instrument work on a rock that has similar regular rows of "teeth" like the one (B&W image) in the previous post.

They encountered a bunch of massive rocks with somewhat similar striations previously:

Joe Smith


Posts: xxx

Reply: 363



PostPosted: April 28, 2018 10:14 AM 

concerning the "Note the regular bands of holes.".......does this often occur in Earth
locations??..I mean is this a common artifact?
thx

Joe Smith


Posts: xxx

Reply: 364



PostPosted: April 28, 2018 12:00 PM 

Responding to old posts....posts that I missed for various reasons,,, posts that I run across years later... treasured emails from important people. No I will not name anyone but all in rocket flight. Myself?

.a pulp-wood cutter and hauler who upon finding a drilling rig, got his self a job on two of them. No I tell no lies...Mission well service,, Odessa Texas,,, Burned out bad after third rod-wrenching well of the day...
I came back a year later ... rough-necking until a drilling job came open,, saving money...

Now I am old and gray.. Big and Bent and Gray and Old....

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 365



PostPosted: April 28, 2018 6:48 PM 

Joe Smith;

Regular bands of holes? Coral stones

Google coral rocks images

eg:

[link]

Winston

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 366



PostPosted: April 29, 2018 8:32 PM 

X-eye of the target.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 367



PostPosted: May 2, 2018 7:34 PM 

New micro-images.

Note the small grains in the dark areas. I think they would be about 300 microns across. They could be dead bacteria. Although that is a mega-size for bacteria, there is at least one species on Earth as large: Thiomargarita namibiensis. (Think of Margarita for Cinco De Mayo coming up soon.) This is a coccoid (spherical shaped) bacterium that oxidizes sulfides. It tends to grow in rows of connected spheres.

Notice the blade-like projections of dark wafer-thin material. You could cut yourself from handling this rock!

Joe Smith


Posts: xxx

Reply: 368



PostPosted: May 2, 2018 8:51 PM 

....my goodness!!,,,, consider me suitably
pleased,,,, hmmm I abruptly remembered Victoria crater,, many many sol's back...
black sand whorls in the one-third gravity system......my-oh-my

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 369



PostPosted: May 2, 2018 10:25 PM 

Sorry, I got the "eyes" wrong on those images. The "blades" are actually shadows. See the above correction to the first image. The second is also messed up.

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 370



PostPosted: May 3, 2018 1:26 PM 

Re: #369, No blades but very interesting detail!

Paul Scott Anderson


Posts: 53

Reply: 371



PostPosted: May 4, 2018 10:08 PM 

The MER team is saying that the unusual vesicular rocks here are NOT volcanic. 🤔

[link]

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 372



PostPosted: May 5, 2018 7:35 AM 

Thanks Paul!

Winston

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 373



PostPosted: May 5, 2018 6:45 PM 

Partially recognizable rock signatures of different kinds, but perhaps altered in similar ways (high silicon) by some new kind of "weathering process." Rocks with fillings that may even be covered in some cases by a "film." Multiple layers of "coatings" piled on top of each other. Wow! Are they inching towards a possible biological explanation, perhaps? And there are still the tabular rocks to explore. Exciting times!

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 374



PostPosted: May 5, 2018 7:47 PM 

earthquakes-marsquakes-and-possibility-life

The discussion about faults at Perseverance is interesting in view of the above article. The metabolism of Thiomargarita Namibiensis essentially involves oxidation of hydrogen (hydrogen sulfide to water and sulfur).

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 375



PostPosted: May 9, 2018 11:15 PM 

Lots of interest here.

Joe Smith


Posts: xxx

Reply: 376



PostPosted: May 10, 2018 7:26 PM 

well??? don't keep us in suspense Barsoomer!..
Inquiring Minds and all that ....

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 377



PostPosted: May 10, 2018 10:03 PM 

Interest, like Beauty, is in the eye of the beholder.

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 378



PostPosted: May 10, 2018 11:34 PM 

I see some sulfur there. Wonder what is the pH?

Winston

Barsoomer; Very beautiful composite at reply 376?

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 379



PostPosted: May 11, 2018 1:16 AM 

Thanks Winston. Yes, I would like to think the yellow and reddish-yellow might be forms (allotropes) of sulfur.

Here is the latest MI with something that caught my eye.


LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 380



PostPosted: May 11, 2018 7:53 AM 

Degraded brain coral from google

Winston

Previous 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19


Join the conversation:















Very Happy Smile Sad Surprised
Shocked Confused Cool Laughing
Mad Razz Embarassed Crying or Very Sad
Evil or Very Mad Twisted Evil Rolling Eyes Wink
Powered by MTSmileys