South Endeavour Crater - Page 15

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Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 281



PostPosted: March 10, 2018 8:36 PM 

Cross-eye 3D version. The pancam right-eye filters don't really have RGB so I used mixes suggested by Horton to approximate the right-eye color.

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 282



PostPosted: March 10, 2018 8:45 PM 

L456 version of my earlier image

You might be right. The light coloured rock might be an eroded (wind, dust, water vapour) version of the dark rough surfaced rocks ) but if so why do the broken rocks appear to be pure white inside without any of the surface tinge seen in the pale raised rock I pointed out earlier?

Winston

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 283



PostPosted: March 10, 2018 9:11 PM 

some more sol 5021 rocks. These look very biological

Examine under maximum magnification possible without pixellation.

Winston

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 284



PostPosted: March 10, 2018 11:41 PM 

Winston, I think the broken rocks with pure white flat broken surfaces are "normal" rocks formed by ordinary geological processes.

However, I think most of the rocks we see in this area are different, perhaps due to its past status as a relative "oasis" in a mostly harsh environment. (Or perhaps modern erosion has uncovered a relic of an ancient more uniformly benign environment.)

Remember the movie "The Blob" that depicted an amoeba-like creature that could envelop things? I think Mars may have hosted a biological phenomenon that could form a membrane-like body that could envelop soil and gravel. There might be several layers of such membranes with pebbles etc. sandwiched in between. Perhaps the soil would be expelled as the dark sand, leaving a gooey mixture of pebbles and membrane substance. Here are some images that may be suggestive in this regard. (The green is green but the others are false color.)



Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 285



PostPosted: March 11, 2018 10:15 PM 

Winston, you have mentioned stromatolites in the past. Could they create blob-like layers that might incorporate soil and gravel? Might they fit the bill for what we see here?

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 286



PostPosted: March 12, 2018 7:11 AM 

Yes, I think

Winston

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 287



PostPosted: March 13, 2018 4:59 PM 

I neglected to mention that your description above is almost a textbook description for a bumpy stromatolite

See below:
http://www.evolutionaryresearch.org/Gallery%205.htm

Winston

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 288



PostPosted: March 13, 2018 7:21 PM 

Winston, thanks very much for that link! There do seem to be a lot of bumpy ones and maybe other kinds too.

The erosion process on Mars seems different, though, when complete:

The bumpy parts seem to erode away into the dark sand, leaving behind cavernous hollow parts and a twisty matrix.

There are new MIs.

Judging by the wind trails, the rock involved has been relatively inactive compared to the other rocks we see around. The intention may be to obtain background readings for comparison with later readings on the more altered rocks. This MI:

seems the most interesting to me but unfortunately does not seem to have a stereo match.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 289



PostPosted: March 13, 2018 10:51 PM 

These are the locations of the MI images:

Winston, maybe can they be auto-stitched?

Found a partner for the "caged" image:

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 290



PostPosted: March 14, 2018 9:13 PM 

Looks like they brushed the rock right in the middle of the MI'ed area. There seem to be intricate braided structures that are firm enough not to break from the brushing. I also see a multitude of small round forms that may be below the braided structures or contained within them or both.

Very promising. I look forward to further discoveries in this area.

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 291



PostPosted: March 15, 2018 8:26 AM 

Barsoomer

Stitched MI image below

Winston

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 292



PostPosted: March 15, 2018 11:59 PM 

Winston, thanks!

Image from 289 after brushing.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 293



PostPosted: March 16, 2018 10:45 PM 

Lots of veins here. Some of them remind me of shoots sent out by strawberry plants that develop into new plants.

Now they have applied the grinder to the MI target. This seems to show a distinct crust above what may be a soil and gravel interior.

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 294



PostPosted: March 16, 2018 11:25 PM 

Barsoomer; re. 293

Looks gooey wet!

Winston

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 295



PostPosted: March 17, 2018 3:23 AM 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thiomargarita_namibiensis

Chemo-lithrotrophic sulfide-reducing bacteria large enough (100-750 microns) to show up in the Microscopic Imager if present. Forms chains of spheres.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 296



PostPosted: March 19, 2018 11:43 PM 

Thiomargarita_namibiensis

Sorry, the bacteria are sulfer-oxidizing, not reducing. They oxidize sulfide to elemental sulfer, which they then store in vacuoles comprising the bulk of their large size. This storage mechanism allows them to survive when nutrients are scarce. They do rely on occasional marine flows to provide nitrates, which are used as the oxidant. However, they are versatile and can also use oxygen. On Mars perhaps they could use perchlorate.

In the above image, note the yellowish cast of the rock coatings. (Winston, you also noted a yellowed rock.) This could be due to elemental sulfer. The dark rocks might perhaps contain sulfides, which are mostly dark.

There is also a lot of green in this L456 composite, but that may involve some other process.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 297



PostPosted: March 19, 2018 11:48 PM 

Please excuse my misspelling: that should be sulfur, not sulfer.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 298



PostPosted: March 20, 2018 11:41 PM 


Intensely green coatings on some of the rocks in the foreground (near bank). Not sure what it means. Maybe they gave a longer exposure to the green filter image. Maybe it's a yellow coating over blue rock. Or maybe...!

Parallel-eye, from Sol5031 pancam. Like something out of Lewis Carroll's "Jabberwocky":

"Twas brillig, and the slithy toves. Did gyre..."

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 299



PostPosted: March 21, 2018 2:12 PM 

"all mimsy were the borogroves and the mome raths outgrabe"

The Jabberwock by lewis carroll is the only poem that I learnt at high school level that I can still remember. In fact the Jabberwock strangely influenced my interest in weird SCi Fi books and stories.

I am therefore very interested in how you came to use the phrase from the Jabberwock in your reply 298.

Does it look like a remnant head severed by a vorpal blade?

On a more serious note the Curiosity landscape images show predominantly green channels in practically every image. I have not seen any data that correlates these green areas with water content but it sure would be interesting if such data exist.

Winston

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 300



PostPosted: March 23, 2018 1:48 AM 

Perhaps they have enhanced the green channel in an attempt to detect chlorophyll (or, less romantically, olivine).

Here is another mystery:

It seems the microscopic imager has been placed closer than the focal length so the image is blurred. However, this also provides a larger image. Perhaps they are trying to see if the "sand" resolves into tiny spheres (which it seems to in this case). A deconvolution algorithm might improve this image further, if any one has access to such (photoshop?).

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