Mount Sharp Extended mission 1a - Page 8

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LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 141



PostPosted: May 24, 2017 9:25 AM 

Oops!
Wrong image above.

Should be this one

https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/MSL-Curiosity/i-2c686sg/0/daa265f2/O/1703-CR0_548686228PRC_F0631450CCAM15903L1-crop2-anim.gif

Winston

John Radogno


Posts: 37

Reply: 142



PostPosted: May 24, 2017 6:46 PM 

I think it was hit with a few laser blasts.

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 143



PostPosted: May 24, 2017 10:33 PM 

Here is an example from 1705:

And After (image shot slightly lower):

Notice how the shots scatter the debris?

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 144



PostPosted: May 24, 2017 11:53 PM 

John;

I think you're right!

Here's an anim of the sol 1705 chem cam images.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/MSL-Curiosity/i-NkL3kpm/0/189229a6/O/1705-laser%20shot%20anim.gif

Note aggregation of small spots of first frame into larger spots of 2nd frame and less scattering of debris (spots)

Winston

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 145



PostPosted: May 25, 2017 6:31 PM 

The innards of a martian rock.
Sol 1705 Mastcam stitch of 5 images.

Was some subsurface erosion going on here?

Winston

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 146



PostPosted: May 25, 2017 11:01 PM 

Sol 1705 again, 3D of Chem cam images showing what might be remnants of a dark micro flow draped over fissure on rock. Lower right corner.

Winston

John Radogno


Posts: 37

Reply: 147



PostPosted: May 26, 2017 4:00 PM 

That is an interesting concept. Erosion might not be the right word for it, it might be the leftovers of some kind of chemical disintigration. These delicate structures must be more resistant to erosion than the rock around it. Maybe something like fossilized sea weed with a more robust mineralization than the surounding material.

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 148



PostPosted: May 26, 2017 6:23 PM 

Yes; John Radogno!

The above is nothing new. It is just one more example of circumstantial evidence that I've been teasing out and presenting based on the Mars Rovers images for many years now.

The weird "erosion" of most of the sedimentary rock types that Curi has imaged from almost its first days in Gale crater until now are largely unexplainable as either wind or water erosion but might be some sort of chemical or even biological erosion.

I've highlighted several of the outstanding examples of such erosion over the years in my ebooks. e.g. the overturned rocks where the former undersurfaces have been compartmentalized into distinct chambers or the fine, delicate lamellar structures that appear to habe produced very fine dark dust, some sticking to the lamellae and all of different colour to the overlying sand or dust suggestive of chemical changes.

The main point, however, is that this phenomenon is ubiquitous as one might expect of a biologically enhanced process, and, indeed, might even be ongoing.

Winston

John Radogno


Posts: 37

Reply: 149



PostPosted: May 26, 2017 9:01 PM 

Re:146
Looks like surface material UNDER the fissure, with dark shadow along the left side.
My comment #147 was in respose to #145

Joe Smith


Posts: 86

Reply: 150



PostPosted: May 27, 2017 6:54 PM 

LWS

Thanks for some awesome awesome pictures.
No,, I did not make a typo.

Mars is iron rust,, Reply 145 could go directly into a crucible.

Building on the surface of mars will be from local resources.

Thanks! to all who read and comment here.

Joe Smith


Posts: 86

Reply: 151



PostPosted: May 27, 2017 7:06 PM 

We must always be aware first of the gravity and the atmospheric pressure. Then perhaps? the salt content thereby rust. From iron. I will look at it this way until I can be proven wrong. The heavy metals buried in this
planet is worth trillions.

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 152



PostPosted: May 27, 2017 7:40 PM 

Joe Smith

Thanks!

Winston

joesmith


Posts: 86

Reply: 153



PostPosted: May 28, 2017 7:24 PM 

re:147

How far back in time was this ocean?
How long has Mars lived under a hot sun and
freezing nights?
..Mars has winds, and dust collects in the Martian atmosphere..so I think things might change on the surface rather faster than a lot of us suspect.
The things we discover will be two world changing. Seriously.

Mankind has moved at an exceptional rate the last hundred years,none of us will live to see man setteling on Mars,,, but I can go away Knowing that at least This technology is in good hands. Go SpaceX. Any young person reading this interested in space,, then Your turn is coming. Make it happen. This era in future history will be known (maybe)as the return to space after Apollo.

South Texas off the coast....wind from the west...off the ocean. Sunday evening coming down...
Thanks to all here!...talking to you...oldtimers!!

Serious Thanks to Whoever it is that keeps this Blog/Forum alive.

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 154



PostPosted: May 30, 2017 6:41 PM 

Joe,
NASA (4-5-2015) estimates about 4.3 billion years ago that likely covered almost half of the northern hemisphere with some areas more than a mile deep. This would have ended by 3.7 billion years ago, so, a 600 million year window for ocean based life. This is separate from various intermittent lakes which may have come and gone repeatedly for a much longer period. Here are some ideas of what it may have looked like:

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 155



PostPosted: June 1, 2017 11:49 PM 

Here's the best example I've seen of analogues of domal stromatolites in Gale crater so far.

Winston

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 156



PostPosted: June 2, 2017 10:20 AM 

Winston,
Here is something that looks like it was dragged out of a swamp. There are some very interesting bubbles packed into this formation that also have a slight resemblance to stromatolites. What do you think?

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 157



PostPosted: June 2, 2017 4:45 PM 

John;

I saw that one late last night and autoequalised it to extend the range of colours in the image. I think that it is also reminiscent of stromatolites

Here is the autoequalized image from sol 1710

Winston

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 158



PostPosted: June 3, 2017 12:47 AM 

Looks like of biology in these sol 1714 Mahli images;

Look at the surfaces of the white vein like stuff at the bottom of the image for the wannabee filaments and spores etc.

Winston

Paul Scott Anderson


Posts: 53

Reply: 159



PostPosted: June 3, 2017 2:04 PM 

A bunch more images this morning showing rocks covered in "nodules":

https://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=1714&camera=MAST%5F

Thoughts, anyone?

John Radogno


Posts: xxx

Reply: 160



PostPosted: June 3, 2017 10:22 PM 

Paul,
I could not get your link to work in my browser. There are many images of these rocks with the nodules and they are all very interesting.

They seem to have greenish tint. It would be hard to think that anything could be alive in the hostile, radioactive environment, and if these nodes are fossils that may be too mineralized at this point to verify. But it sure looks biological! The white stuff that Winston was pointing out is also very interesting. Hopefully the Chemcam will find something.

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