Mount Sharp - Extended Mission 1 - Page 63

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Author Message
LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 1241



PostPosted: March 15, 2016 8:49 AM 

Here's another example of flows into cracks in the surface at Gale.

Again, running brine seems to be involved.

Winston

Harry Rabb


Posts: xxx

Reply: 1242



PostPosted: March 15, 2016 9:38 AM 

Here is an interesting shell shaped object
on left 8 a clock direction:

BR - Harry

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 1243



PostPosted: March 16, 2016 5:10 PM 

Harry;

Thanks for pointing it out.

The rock outcrop below it also looks interesting. It looks like a microbialite / tafoni type structure. See crop below of your object looking like a small piece of a "jawbone with indentations for teeth" left centre of the crop and the rock that resembles a microbialite / tafoni type rock.

Winston

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 1244



PostPosted: March 17, 2016 11:07 AM 

A great example of surface veins and possible microbialite pinnacles

Winston

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 1245



PostPosted: March 17, 2016 11:09 AM 

Winston

john radogno


Posts: 37

Reply: 1246



PostPosted: March 17, 2016 3:13 PM 

The strange spires, combined with the ground veins, and what apperas to be a small arch rock in 1245 maked this one of the most alien looking landscapes I have yet to see on Mars. I am thinking a 100,000 years of wind erosion went into this.

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 1247



PostPosted: March 17, 2016 9:00 PM 

Here's a 3D anaglyph of the strange spires etc. from sol 1272.

There seems to be an intimate relationship between the pinnacle structures and the surface hugging veins. The possible mudstone associations might be a good clue to their origins also.

I think that they are possibly examples of martian microbialite pinnacle and tafoni type structures rather than wind erosion per se.

There are some other enhancements of these structures in my photosite page.


Winston

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 1248



PostPosted: March 17, 2016 9:07 PM 

Here's a panorama stitch of 2 of the sol 1272 images.

Winston

Jason


Posts: 2

Reply: 1249



PostPosted: March 17, 2016 9:25 PM 

Hi Guys, are those 'holes' (about 6) in a line near the centre of the image?

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 1250



PostPosted: March 17, 2016 11:32 PM 

Those holes are generated by the Curi Laser as part of the Chem cam process.

Paul Scott Anderson


Posts: 53

Reply: 1251



PostPosted: March 18, 2016 2:34 AM 

Interesting bright vertical rock face in this ChemCam image of the distant foothills of Mount Sharp, sol 1283. Could it be a hoodoo?

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/proj/msl/redops/ods/surface/sol/01283/soas/rdr/ccam/CR0_511399711PRC_F0531756CCAM02283L1.PNG

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 1252



PostPosted: March 18, 2016 8:53 AM 

Sol 1283 stitched bayer panorama.

Winston

AZ-Dave


Posts: xxx

Reply: 1253



PostPosted: March 21, 2016 11:29 AM 

Vultures Lair:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=1272MR0059490610603999E01_DXXX&s=1272

Interesting pile of assorted white debris under a dark Basaltic outcrop...and of course the eroded sickle-sandstone pinnacle things as well.

Paul Scott Anderson


Posts: 53

Reply: 1254



PostPosted: March 21, 2016 3:29 PM 

Interesting new paper for the LPSC meeting about the detection of various kinds of organic molecules by Curiosity in mudstone samples, including evidence for more complex precursor molecules. At the end:

"As of today, it is undetermined if the origin of those molecules is biotic or abiotic. However, the variety of molecules detected is consistent with the ones found in meteorites such as Murchison or Tissint."

http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2016/pdf/2568.pdf

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 1255



PostPosted: March 22, 2016 2:44 PM 

Thanks Paul for linking that abstract in your 1252. I posted an item about Murchison a few months ago to remind folks that organic compounds of abiotic origin are well known from carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Tissint is a Mars meteorite of the shergottite variety. In the process of looking it up I came across Mojave Crater, low latitude, 58 km in diameter, suggested as a source of all the shergotittes, and believed to have formed in the last few million years, more recently than any other Martian Crater this size or larger:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mojave_(crater)

Wow! Look at all those alluvial channels that apparently shaped the crater walls after the impact. And this is clearly a recent event, not something related to conditions early in Mars' history.

There's lots of interesting stuff from this LPSC. I came across this effort by Carr and Head "The Geologic History of Mars: Unanswered Questions". Its good to read about the big picture sometimes:

http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2016/pdf/2541.pdf (Coincidentally J. W. Head is also an author of the first paper published on the slope wasting at Gale, see the Active Mars thread.)

This paper I think could be considered a summary of mainstream Mars science. It tries to separate what we really know as fact about Mars versus what we don't know. How does the Ancient Earth-like Mars scenario, apparently so beloved of the rover science teams, relate to the facts of Mars. Its just not there yet. It turns up in this summary briefly as a possibility, but its definitely not part of the mainstream canon. I've got a feeling that we've already seen the apogee of the Earth-like Mars idea.

And again coincidentally, also with J. W. Head as an author: "Late Noachian Valley Network Formation on Mars: An Assessment of the Impact Crater-Related Formation Mechanism." Horan and Head

http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2016/pdf/1160.pdf

It follows on from the work of Segura et al on the probable effects of impact on the atmosphere and global surface of Mars. Turns out that an impact as big as the Argyre event would plausibly cause widespread melting of ground ice and heavy rainfall for up to 400 years. These authors conclude that the catastrophic precipitation from such a large event would cause TOO MUCH surface runoff and erosion to be a likely cause of the Highland Valley Networks. Anyway, again, there's no need to interpret the valley networks as evidence of a stable Earth-like climate. The mainstream never has.

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 1256



PostPosted: March 22, 2016 2:56 PM 

Re my 1255, I got that number of Paul's post wrong. It is 1254, not 1252, but here's my question: Weren't there 3 identical copies of Paul's post yesterday, but today there's just one? Does this mean that someone is acting as moderator again? Hope so.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 1257



PostPosted: March 22, 2016 3:32 PM 

I posted a link to the LPSC in the Mars Science topic. Did no one notice it?

I saw Paul's post yesterday, but only one copy.

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 1258



PostPosted: March 22, 2016 4:43 PM 

I saw only one post from Paul.
I also noticed Barsoomer's post but I have not yet been able to look at the papers there.

Winston

Paul Scott Anderson


Posts: 53

Reply: 1259



PostPosted: March 22, 2016 5:06 PM 

Yeah, it posted three times for some reason, but then someone fixed it. Good, I don't know who though. Wink

LWS


Posts: xxx

Reply: 1260



PostPosted: March 22, 2016 7:18 PM 

Paul and Kye;

I also hope that the removal of the extra posts means that we have an invisible moderator. If so Hooray!

Winston

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