Mount Sharp - Extended Mission 1 - Page 48

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Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 941



PostPosted: July 15, 2015 1:21 PM 

Kevin, it looks to me like the rock has been sand-blasted on that side. I'm wondering how such differential erosion could take place. The un-blasted surfaces of rocks seem to have a hard rind that protects them from normal wind erosion. Perhaps something that removes that rind opens them up to greater erosion, but that begs the question of what could remove the rind. I see a number of possibilities: (1) the rock was broken open as a result of an impact; (2) a dust devil passed over the rock causing concentrated sand-blasting; (3) a peculiar concentration of wind from a storm and/or the local topography had the same effect; (4) some chemical or biological process removed the rind in that area.

LWS


Posts: 3062

Reply: 942



PostPosted: July 15, 2015 6:22 PM 

Barsoomer; I think it is Curi's laser that did the trick.

Kye; I don't see the actual Curi tracks in the areas with a concentration of broken rocks but the bigger pictures show curi wheel tracks above and below that area and pointing as though the wheels moved through it.

I think the breaking of the rocks was deliberately done by Curi's handlers. But I might be totally wrong.

LWS


Posts: 3062

Reply: 943



PostPosted: July 15, 2015 10:50 PM 

Could these be clods of clay?

[link]

Winston

LWS


Posts: 3062

Reply: 944



PostPosted: July 15, 2015 11:24 PM 

Here's a sol 1042 image of a weird artifact.
I wonder what it is? Any guesses?

Look at it in imagestereophotomaker at 200%.

The image is magnified 1.5 x.

Winston

dishman


Posts: 67

Reply: 945



PostPosted: July 16, 2015 6:52 AM 

Winston, reminds me of a wasp's nest like we get here down under. I regularly have to remove them during winter before they hatch in spring. !!!

dishman


Posts: 67

Reply: 946



PostPosted: July 16, 2015 6:57 AM 

Winston, your 943, reminds me of Manganese nodules found in the ocean here on Earth. Sorry for two post's, but I got a timeout on the first Sad and re-posted.

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 947



PostPosted: July 19, 2015 3:34 PM 

Here's a couple of interesting sightings in the sol 1048 ChemCam images:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/proj/msl/redops/ods/surface/sol/01048/soas/rdr/ccam/CR0_490527769PRC_F0482224CCAM01048L1.PNG

There's a tiny sand slide in that image, bottom center at the top of the fissure, a little triangle of crust is outlined by darker fractures, and a little dark sand has dribbled out below it. We saw a slide this tiny at The Kimberley when the MAHLI was used to look under an overhang.

These two images taken about 6 minutes apart record a change:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/proj/msl/redops/ods/surface/sol/01048/soas/rdr/ccam/CR0_490528147PRC_F0482224CCAM01048L1.PNG http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/proj/msl/redops/ods/surface/sol/01048/soas/rdr/ccam/CR0_490528527PRC_F0482224CCAM01048L1.PNG

A pebble appears in the sand in the second image. I'm referring to the largest patch of dark sand in the images which changes position because of camera re-pointing. The location is in full sun and the lighting can't change much in 6 minutes. The pebble is not there in the first image and is there in the second image, just below center. The change could result from rover activity, I guess. Maybe a laser shot out of the image frame?

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 948



PostPosted: July 19, 2015 3:45 PM 

That's strange. Those images copied from the JPL library didn't get converted to thumbnail links as I expected. Maybe its time I worked on my basic WEB skills, but there's so much one could work on. I'll try that again here with links from Midnight Planets.

[link]

There's a tiny sand slide in that image, bottom center at the top of the fissure, a little triangle of crust is outlined by darker fractures, and a little dark sand has dribbled out below it. We saw a slide this tiny at The Kimberley when the MAHLI was used to look under an overhang.

These two images taken about 6 minutes apart record a change:

[link] [link]

A pebble appears in the sand in the second image. I'm referring to the largest patch of dark sand in the images, which changes position because of camera re-pointing. The location is in full sun and the lighting can't change much in 6 minutes. The pebble is not there in the first image and is there in the second image, just below center. The change could result from rover activity, I guess. Maybe a laser shot out of the image frame?

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 949



PostPosted: July 19, 2015 10:09 PM 

The small dark circular area only in the second image?

Could it be a laser shot itself?

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 950



PostPosted: July 19, 2015 10:44 PM 

Barsoomer, Yes you"re probably right. It looks like there's a bump sticking up just beyond the dark oval, but that could be sand pushed up by the tiny explosion of the laser strike. So yes, its probably just a solitary laser shot. I'm encouraged by the scientists' continuing interest in the sand. Does it have a different composition where it is causing slides than it does elsewhere?

LWS


Posts: 3062

Reply: 951



PostPosted: July 20, 2015 8:38 AM 

A biological construct?

Here's some intriguing pavement rock from sol 1049.

Winston

LWS


Posts: 3062

Reply: 952



PostPosted: July 20, 2015 8:40 AM 

Testing

marsatic


Posts: xxx

Reply: 953



PostPosted: July 20, 2015 2:58 PM 

Hmm, some strange looking curled rocks sticking out of the top layer of that rock. One of them look like a seashell somewhat...

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 954



PostPosted: July 21, 2015 3:15 AM 

Here's a really good example of the same rock eroded in two different ways:

I'm looking at the big outcrop in the center of the image. It took a moment to figure out that a big piece of the outcrop has broken off and fallen forward, so that the layering in it is now almost vertical. The old surfaces of the outcrop, showing in the broken piece and to the upper left, appear DRAMATICALLY LAYERED, but the newer broken surface of the outcrop shows NO LAYERING AT ALL. This is a good example because there can be no doubt that the two kinds of surface are on the same kind of rock. We're really lucky that Mars' erosion, whatever it is, is able to pick out the tiny, initially invisible, differences between the layers and accentuate them, otherwise we might not be seeing any layering in this landscape. I think that all the layering at Gale is barely "real". The layers were all created at the same time and record very small differences in density, not a long sequence of deposition one layer at a time.

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 955



PostPosted: July 21, 2015 12:45 PM 

Here's a closer view showing part of the image I linked in 954:

Both kinds of rock surface, the apparently layered and the seemingly not layered, show tiny holes, so maybe these holes are present deep inside the rock and are not the result of surface erosion. They can't be bubble holes in vesicular lava, because this clearly isn't lava, though it is likely basaltic rock if its like most that's been tested, basalt that's been broken up into fines and cemented back together without much chemical alteration. I'd like to think that the holes are caused by erosion within the rock but that's just one possibility.

Those ChemCam images I linked in 948 show an area in the center of this image. The little slide I identified is confirmed by more disturbance (another line in the sand crust) further down the fissure. The dot I thought was a newly arrived pebble is there. It doesn't look much like a laser zap after all (see Barsoomer's 949, my 950) , but hard to say. There's usually a cluster of zaps.

Kevin


Posts: xxx

Reply: 956



PostPosted: July 23, 2015 9:38 AM 

These fracture fills almost look like chalk but no doubt they are made up of Calcium and bits of rock they give the impression that they were formed by water rising up from beneath the surface.

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 957



PostPosted: July 23, 2015 1:53 PM 

The biggest deposit of sand in this image (bottom, left of center) sure looks like a colluvial fan, or as sometimes called a colluvial cone, that is, an accumulation of material collected at the toe of a slope through gravity induced movement of loose material down the slope. On Earth where the falling rock has been routed along the bottom of a steep ravine, a cone shaped pile is created where the ravine opens onto a gentler slope. In this case It helps to confirm the first impression of a colluvial structure that we can still see the latest increment of sand as a slightly darker tongue-shaped terminal lobe right below the fissure. We've seen similar structures many times at Gale. There are now probably several 10s of good examples. I'm trying to get around to collecting them all. Here's one more from Cooperstown. Lower left in the image most of the surface of the cone appears recently active and the material seems to have emerged from a fissure with a "roof":

Back to the first image. How many folks around here can accept that the pile has accumulated from sand that has moved through the fissure above? I think many would find this reasonable and not particularly surprising, but its actually an unexpected and extraordinary observation. Because there is no reason for it to be happening. Sand slopes at Gale are active in THOUSANDS of places that we've imaged, but we haven't found a single active dune.

The only expected, not-extraordinary explanation of that pile of sand is that it is a wind ripple. I think that it is not simply a wind ripple. Its probably basically a colluvial structure, but its not perfect in that regard: The top of the cone doesn't line up exactly with the bottom end of the fissure and the pile has a sharp crest on the right that suggests wind.

LWS


Posts: 3062

Reply: 958



PostPosted: July 23, 2015 4:56 PM 

Kye; Here's my take on an area in your sol 439 image from your reply 957 that I think is a good examplar of the things I've been trying to get across about the "debris flows".

The image clearly shows a largish debris flow emanating from below a covered crevice between 2 rocks that has now been lightly covered by the martian soil. The characteristics of the debris flow ie. Cracked surface dark flowing undersurface that moves downhill under gravity, probably resulting from some sort of disturbance and possibly being also a resultant of water in the subsurface lubricating a matrix that might be a habitat for current microbes.

Look at the lobed area near the middle bottom of the image just above the cone of the pyrimidal rock at the bottom centre. The image has been auto-equalized in Gimp and magnified by 1.5X.

Winston

Kevin


Posts: xxx

Reply: 959



PostPosted: July 24, 2015 11:22 AM 

Curiosity to return to target Silica rocks that are unlike anything they have seen before:

http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/news/display.cfm?News_ID=49544

marsatic


Posts: xxx

Reply: 960



PostPosted: July 24, 2015 12:20 PM 

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=CR0_490968893PRC_F0482470CCAM03053L1&s=1053

What kind of a rock look like a pimple with roots?

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