YellowKnife Bay - Page 5

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marsman


Posts: 303

Reply: 81



PostPosted: January 12, 2013 7:46 PM 

This may be a possible comparison to the images that were posted by Hortonheardawho in Reply 61.

Quote:

"Lichens gain a root-hold in tiny crevices in the rock. Lichens hold water, which freezes and cracks the rock, beginning to form a soil of powdered rock and organic matter."

http://ianhday.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/Succession.htm

/R

marsman

hortonheardawho


Posts: 3465

Reply: 82



PostPosted: January 12, 2013 8:54 PM 

sol 0153 enhanced difference false color of peculiar soil in Yellowknife Bay:


It looks like multiple layers of peeling paint.

This type of soil also appears under a nearby rock:

Where is a soil guy when you need him?
( Stop laughing Ben. )

hortonheardawho


Posts: 3465

Reply: 83



PostPosted: January 12, 2013 9:39 PM 

Curiosity sol 0153 enhanced difference false color of peculiar holey rocks:

Compare and contrast with this Earthly fossil from my personal collection of Cambriam burrows:

Here are some more.

marsman


Posts: 303

Reply: 84



PostPosted: January 12, 2013 10:25 PM 

Very interesting..

On the subject of peeling soil, I found this blog entry on Cryptobiotic soil:

Quote:

"This dirt is alive. It is made of tiny living things. They are like a rug convering the ground. Water makes the soil crust swell and move. The ground gets bumpy...Notice how it kind of looks like rubber/latex peeling on the open edges, this is the crust also. Crypto-biotic soils are important. They help keep the soil firm. They stop wind and water from moving the dirt. They also help feed and water the soil."

http://www.roninwheelers.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=638

And from Reply 80 (Mars Peeling Soil):

/R

marsman

marsman


Posts: 303

Reply: 85



PostPosted: January 13, 2013 12:19 AM 

It looks like I missed this one from Reply 51 and 54:


How about white lichen?

/R

marsman

hortonheardawho


Posts: 3465

Reply: 86



PostPosted: January 13, 2013 6:00 PM 

sol 0153 3D false color of peculiar rock under a rock in Yellowknife Bay:

There really, really, needs to be some MAHLI 3D of this area.

J. Chris Campbell


Posts: xxx

Reply: 87



PostPosted: January 14, 2013 12:00 PM 

Please Please someone tell me that this is Proof of life?

Wildcat


Posts: xxx

Reply: 88



PostPosted: January 14, 2013 2:11 PM 

Looks very licheny, Chris.

newboy


Posts: 1

Reply: 89



PostPosted: January 14, 2013 2:44 PM 

My comment finally posted way back, so I repeat it here to give a 'geoview' on your 81, Hort.

I have not seen 'burst boils' like these before anywhere (reply 22), in the sense that they are small. Mud volcanoes have the same profile but can be much larger, even 1-2 metres across.

They look like gas bubbles that have blown upwards into the overlying sediments. It looks like they have formed in a finer grained sediment and pushed up into an overlying coarser sand layer, but the image is not good enough to be sure.

For those unfamiliar with looking at bedding planes, we have an oblique view here (22) - imagine the layers gradually stepping up across the view, with the lowest layer in the foreground.

From a sedimentary origin point of view, sediments that have entrapped gas that escapes upwards in this manner occur in environments where deposition of the 'gassy' unit was rapid and where the sediments are fine grained sand or silt (think of the pretty sand pictures sold in wooden frames). Degassing structures are often seen in turbidite sequences but I don't think we had oceanic or even deep water sedimentation here! Flash floods is the obvious mechanism to invoke - I look forward to seeing what the experts make of them.

The ridges/trails that you can see behind some of them (from the camera position) are due to wind erosion, following their exposure to the present day environment.

Regarding 80, this could be laminated sediments 'peeling' back, as you say. But there is a lot of cross-cutting veining everywhere and you can't see if this is an alternative.

Hort's 84 certainly looks like a sandstone bed (the white shelf) lying on veined sediments, suggesting a time gap. Or the veins formed in the finer sediments and couldn't penetrate the overlying sandstone.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 90



PostPosted: January 14, 2013 5:21 PM 

[link]

Curiosity telecon tomorrow.

Paul Scott Anderson


Posts: 53

Reply: 91



PostPosted: January 14, 2013 8:03 PM 

The mottled pattern in both images (sol 135 and the new one from sol 157) does look a lot like white lichen. The feature is being discussed on the other forum too, but of course any reference to possible astrobiology is strictly forbidden... Wink

Wildcat


Posts: xxx

Reply: 92



PostPosted: January 14, 2013 9:14 PM 

Paul, LOL.

It's no wonder our young people are not interested in science and math. Take UMSF for example. These people are not involved with the mission for the most part. They simply enjoy looking at the pictures like we do. Yet, they are so careful to remain completely objective as if they are getting paid to work on the mission.

They describe it as "fine pattern running across the centre" with "white material" around the "vein." What? That sounds like a lawyer describing something. How confounding, uninspiring, and completely boring.

Show that picture to a gardener, a high school kid mowing lawns as a summer job, or someone that likes to go on nature walks. None of these folks are likely to have much of higher education, but I bet you they'll quickly identify it as "that stuff that grows on rocks/trees" because that is exactly what it looks like. Hey, guess what? We have a hunch that stuff can actually live on Mars. Why don't we drive our billion dollar machine over to check it out with one of those fancy instruments? Isn't that the goal?

Can't wait for us to drive by it.

In 50 years, people are going to look back on these missons and laugh at how we didn't see all the signs of life thrown right in front of our faces.

Wildcat


Posts: xxx

Reply: 93



PostPosted: January 14, 2013 9:19 PM 

LOL, Paul.

They go to such great pains to show complete objectivity. They sound like a bunch of lawyers with their confounding descriptions.

Show that picture to a gardener, a kid that mows lawns as a summer job, or someone that likes to nature walk and they'll identify it as "the stuff that grows on trees/rocks" because that's exactly what it looks like.

Well, guess what? We have a hunch that the stuff that grows on rocks can actually live on Mars. Now.

No wonder people are not interested in science. It is technical and uninspiring. Our billion dollar rover will drive right past these interesting "veins" without using any of the fancy instruments onboard to identify it.

Wildcat


Posts: xxx

Reply: 94



PostPosted: January 14, 2013 10:03 PM 

The oddities in this area also look quite spongy.

LWS


Posts: 3062

Reply: 95



PostPosted: January 14, 2013 10:21 PM 

Wildcat;
Nice comparison images. Here's an X-eyed 3D of one of the MAHLI images from sol 154.

Lots of stuff there to ponder.

Winston

LWS


Posts: 3062

Reply: 96



PostPosted: January 14, 2013 10:30 PM 

This one is from the same area on sol 154. Note the pale material exposed by the brushing as well as some areas where the innards of the bluish bubbles seem to have been naturally exposed to reveal their pale contents, looking like a fungal stroma replete with spore like bodies, etc.

Somehow the area also looks damp to me.

Roam with stereophotomaker at 200%. very interesting bio looking objects abound. Don't mind they'll all be interpreted very plausibly as just rocks.

Winston

Winston

Paul Scott Anderson


Posts: 53

Reply: 97



PostPosted: January 15, 2013 12:30 AM 

It was suggested on the other forum that the mottled patterns are crystals in the veins, with dark dirt(?) filling in the boundaries between the crystals. But would this explain the similar-looking "crust" on top of the rock from sol 135, for example?

zoost


Posts: 56

Reply: 98



PostPosted: January 15, 2013 6:50 AM 

[img][/img]

I presume the chemcam pic in #85 is the same material as in the chemcam linked in this post. Very shiny material. It looks like some kind of Mica. Very beautiful and very intriguing. I presume this material casuses all the reflections seen in earlier pictures.

When searching for Minerals and flakes I stubbeld across http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lepidocrocite

More resembling the things Oppy is looking at.

Far to early to say we heard a Who.

J. Chris Campbell


Posts: xxx

Reply: 99



PostPosted: January 15, 2013 8:48 AM 

Are we in Mars Summer? The reason I ask is the area that the rover is in now looks so moist and muddy and has several vents going underground that I would think that in warmer weather this area might have liquid water.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 100



PostPosted: January 15, 2013 4:08 PM 

We are a few weeks before the summer solstice for the southern hemisphere on Mars, which is where the rovers are. The solstice occurs on Feb 27, I believe.

I had to miss the telecon but going to

[link] #maincontent

and reading the captions should give a good summary of the presentations. The white veins seem to be gypsum (calcium sulfate)..

The Q&A period though is usually the most informative part of a telecon. Did anybody catch this one? It should also be recorded on Ustream.

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