Exploration of Cape York - Vol 5 - Page 6

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hortonheardawho


Posts: xxx

Reply: 101



PostPosted: November 18, 2012 12:04 PM 

sol 3135 ( Nov 18, 2012 ) of target rock "SandCherry":

Looks like Oppy is back to the blueberry jam on toast formation. Notice that many of the cracks are thin in the jam. Most likely the "blue" patina once covered the entire rock surface.

This looks like the next science target - but I've been wrong before.

Is this the fabled clay? Come-on Steve, give us a hint!

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 102



PostPosted: November 18, 2012 10:41 PM 

With the Thanksgiving holiday coming up, I expect they will want to do a long APXS somewhere.

hortonheardawho


Posts: xxx

Reply: 103



PostPosted: November 20, 2012 7:33 AM 

sol 3137 (Nov 20, 2012 ) 2x2 MI of SandCherry rock:

with a location link.

The multi-sol APXS integration has begun.

hortonheardawho


Posts: xxx

Reply: 104



PostPosted: November 20, 2012 10:14 PM 

I have added a link to the 3D MI pairs of Sandcherry rock in Ben's formation.

dx


Posts: 1661

Reply: 105



PostPosted: November 21, 2012 12:09 AM 

...a nice rock

yt
dx

dx


Posts: 1661

Reply: 106



PostPosted: November 21, 2012 12:12 AM 

h>>>
Seems my dedication page to you on the tutorial and your tutorial thread are missing!!!
Any ideas?
yt
dx

hortonheardawho


Posts: xxx

Reply: 107



PostPosted: November 21, 2012 1:28 PM 

dx, the missing topics problem is fixed now.

You will have to clear your browser cache.

hortonheardawho


Posts: xxx

Reply: 108



PostPosted: November 21, 2012 4:05 PM 

sol 3135 ( Nov 18, 2012 ) false color pan of Timiskaming:

with location and 3D links.

This is where Ben's insights were invaluable. The double walled cell structures seen here are what kind of geological feature?

Stop laughing up there Ben.

Here is a 3D saturated false color version of reply 105 with a location link.

Soo, what makes the bright red tips on these rocks? Wind blown dust, eh? Why does it stick to the tips of the rock? Oh, you don't know?

Mizar


Posts: 692

Reply: 109



PostPosted: November 21, 2012 4:57 PM 

#108:
If Ben could comment this... it looks like dried crumbled brine swelled out from cracks in the bedrock. For how long time ago?

marsman


Posts: 303

Reply: 110



PostPosted: November 21, 2012 9:15 PM 

Well, that's a really cool rock (middle of the picture in Reply 105). It almost looks like a salamander face.

/R

marsman

dx


Posts: 1661

Reply: 111



PostPosted: November 22, 2012 12:04 PM 

h>>>

Thanks for the updates to those 2 threads, they disappeared with as much mystery as the 'red' rock nesting in the red soil in 105 middle as marsman has pointed out...its obviously out of place...so how is this out of place rock sitting there as its final resting place...or is it? And how did it come rest right there?

When I walk in old abandon quarries I know the rocks in it have been rearranged by man and machinery, so I would expect to discover many similar rocks piled together on purpose-because they were not meant to be quarried, but here in 105, is a red rock right in the middle of nowhere similar to itself! Only questions, but I am sure there is a geologic explanation somewhere out there...and I won't take 'wind' as the answer!

yt
dx

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 112



PostPosted: November 23, 2012 2:37 AM 

I've been considering the "jam on toast" of Ben's Formation since the first example, wondering if the "jam" could be an altered rind or an added coating or something else. This image has me thinking that once again we're seeing layering in the rock, not rinds or coatings:

In the bottom center of the image, where the rock surface steepens toward a fissure, the protruding jam bits seem to be stacked almost one above the other, not draped over the rock surface. Also, the biggest bright outcrop upper-left has jam-like protrusions in parallel, near-horizontal planes. I think we're seeing yet another variation here of the enigmatic fine layering in bright rock we've been seeing since Eagle Crater. Where the layering runs near to parallel with an eroding present-day surface, we see the jam on toast appearance.

newboy


Posts: 1

Reply: 113



PostPosted: November 23, 2012 1:27 PM 

To me, it looks like a weathering crust that is breaking up.

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 114



PostPosted: November 24, 2012 2:37 AM 

I've been back to look at all the "jam on bread" occurrences. I could not find an example suggesting layering in the rock at an orientation differing from the jam plane orientation. I found one more good example of jam that also looks like layering:

On the largest outcrop lower-right there are jam-like protrusions that look stacked in parallel planes. One set of three arcs are classic Meridiani layering. This appearance holds up with 3D. I think that the jam on bread structures originate as layering in the bedrock. We haven't seen exactly this before Cape York. Maybe this uncommon variety of layering includes two types of layers with slightly different properties that alternate in the stack.

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 115



PostPosted: November 24, 2012 3:52 PM 

Newboy, Hi, I wasn't ignoring your 113 when I posted my 114. Both posts turned up during the night sometime. Yes, I had been thinking rind or coating for the "jam" but now I think the evidence is starting to favor layering. I think that we've seen fairly compelling evidence of fine layering in about half of all the Cape York outcrops imaged. Lately, very familiar looking outcrops are turning up, seemingly with much in common with the bright bedrock along the whole traverse, uniform bright fine-grained rock with spherules distributed in the familiar way:

This time the bedrock in that image, by the current mainstream hypothesis, is SUPPOSED to be an impact sediment , but it looks an awful lot like the putative aeolian sandstones that surround Cape York.

And I'll mention one more time that Cape York rock has a lot in common with the plains rock chemically, according to the APXS. The elemental abundances of CY's Tisdale, as illustrated in this graph, have most in common with the plains rock at Gibralter, compared with the other targets. See the bottom of the page:

[link]

If there is another APXS integration going on in this location maybe we'll find out more.

hortonheardawho


Posts: xxx

Reply: 116



PostPosted: November 25, 2012 7:42 PM 

sol 3137 (Nov 20, 2012) 6x3 part of Matijevic false color pan:

If there is the slightest interest I will download the individual 3D pairs.

Barsoomer


Posts: 344

Reply: 117



PostPosted: November 25, 2012 9:29 PM 

I've been dying to see those 3D pairs!

dx


Posts: 1661

Reply: 118



PostPosted: November 27, 2012 9:51 AM 

one of the OPPY pics of Sol 3139

yt
dx

Kye Goodwin


Posts: 1166

Reply: 119



PostPosted: November 27, 2012 6:57 PM 

Horton, Thanks for all the 3D pairs. They are very useful for trying to see the structure of the jam on bread. After looking carefully at every pair I still think that the "jam" represents layering in the rock. Jam patches seem to be flat planar and oriented parallel to each other in a local area. There are ambiguous bits and sometimes it is hard to say what is jam and what is not, but good examples of the jam wrapping around a curve in the underlying rock can't be found.

Going through Horton's 3D pairs I noticed another place where the jam patches appear to overlap like shingles, top center:

By layering here, of course I don't mean sequential layers built up over time, but catastrophic layering created during an impact event. I don't think that this sort of layer need even resemble a continuous sheet, because these layers are barely there to start with, just slight periodic variations in density.

hortonheardawho


Posts: xxx

Reply: 120



PostPosted: November 28, 2012 3:06 PM 

sol 31744 ( Nov 27, 2012 ) of Sandcherry after RAT brush:

There is a bright spot of "green" in the brushed area. Real?

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